Plumbing, Heating, Air Conditioning, and Fire Sprinkler Blog

Fire Sprinkler Omega Recall

Posted by Brian Johnston on Mon, Jan 24, 2011

In October of 1998, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and Central Sprinkler Company issued a joint nationwide recall of 8.4 million Omega brand fire sprinklers. However last week, we had two new customers with Central Model HEC-12 installed and had no idea they were part of the recall. This 1998 recall originally represented less than two percent of the total number of sprinkler heads in use (8.4 million out of over 500 million). Knowing sprinkler systems are extremely reliable and will provide the expected high degree of life and property safety, we would like to remind you that Omega heads are still recalled and replacement is at the customers' expense.
 
We strongly encouraged the public and building owners to find out if they have Omega sprinklers installed in their buildings and to contact Master Craft if Omegas are installed. The recall came about because there were 17 cases in which some Omega sprinklers failed to activate. Fortunately, there has been no loss of life in these fires, and we know that there have been hundreds, if not thousands, of successful activations with Omega sprinklers. Fire sprinklers do save lives!


fire sprinkler recallFire sprinklers have a superior success rate when properly inspected and maintained. They have been installed in buildings for more than 100 years and about 30 million sprinkler heads are now installed each year. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reports that there have been no instances of multiple fatalities in buildings protected with sprinklers. Fire sprinklers for residential dwellings have been available since the early 80’s. Jurisdictions that require sprinklers in homes report that there have been zero fire deaths in homes protected with sprinklers.
Building and home owners with automatic fire sprinkler systems are encouraged to find out if they have Omegas installed.

The recall of the Omega sprinklers includes models referred to or marked as follows:

  • C1 (or C-1)
  • C1A (or C-1A)
  • C-1A PRO (or C1-A PRO)
  • C1-A PRO QR
  • EC-20
  • EC-20A
  • R-1
  • R-1A
  • R-1M
  • Flow Control (FC, Flow Control-FC)
  • Protector-M or M Protector (Upright, Pendent, Sidewall, Sidewall EC)
  • HEC-12
  • EC-12 RES
  • HEC-12 EC
  • HEC-12 EC PRO
  • HEC-12 ID
  • HEC-12 PRO
  • HEC-12 PRO QR
  • HEC-20
  • Prohibitor QR and AC 

Tags: Fire Sprinkler, Recall

Weekend Warrior: Ask for plumbing help

Posted by Brian Johnston on Fri, Jan 14, 2011

It is Friday, so this is for the do-it-yourselfer planning their next project.

Last weekend at the hardware store, I saw a guy buyingshower valve a few plumbing parts. I asked him what project he was working on. Clearly frustrated, he responded his intention was to change out a 20-year old shower valve. Initially, he purchased only the valve but returned to get a different plumber’s wrench and penetrating oil. With new tools, brute force and his inexperience, the shower valve broke off the pipe in the wall as he attempted to remove the original valve.

The trip today, he confessed was to check prices on replacing broken tiles and was forced to buy a bigger escutcheon plate to conceal the wall cavity the emergency service plumber had to make to complete the pipe repairs to get his one bathroom house operational before Monday morning. This guy ended up paying overtime plumbing rates for service on a Sunday.

The lesson here? Know when to ask for help. Coordinating this repair with a trained plumbing contractor would have been an hour and a half job, charged at the more reasonable, daily rates. Probably wouldn't have needed to get the tile replaced either.

Tags: Plumbing Service, Residential, Outhouse Tips

Master Craft Explains Backflow Certification

Posted by Brian Johnston on Wed, Jan 12, 2011

This is part three of three in the series of blog articles to explore why backflow prevention is important for us all, who has or should have a backflow preventer, and why certification of that device is needed.

Certification is needed!

Just like all working systems, they perform best when maintained and certified regularly. Backflow into a public water system can pollute or contaminate the water in that system and each water supplier has a responsibility to provide water that is usable and safe to drink under all foreseeable circumstances. Furthermore, consumers generally have absolute faith that water delivered to them through a public water system is always safe to drink. For these reasons, each water supplier must take reasonable precautions to protect its public water system against backflow.

Mechanical backflow preventers have internal seals, springs, and moving parts that are subject to fouling, wear, or fatigue. Also, mechanical backflow preventers and air gaps can be bypassed. Therefore, all backflow preventers have to be tested periodically to ensure that they are functioning properly. A visual check of air gaps is sufficient, but mechanical backflow preventers have to be tested with properly calibrated gauge equipment.

Responsibility: Consumer

The consumer has the responsibility of backflow prevention. It is at the consumer’s expense in most areas that they shall install, operate, test and maintain approved backflow prevention assemblies as directed by the authority having jurisdiction. Check your records and make sure your backflow preventer is certified! Remember to look for a plumber who is certified to complete your inspection, make the repairs, and notify the water authority of your compliance.

 

Tags: certification, backflow, preventer

Master Craft Explores Backflow

Posted by Brian Johnston on Mon, Jan 10, 2011

This is part two of three in a series of articles to explore what the backflow preventer device does for us all, who has or should have one, and why certification is needed.

The public water utility companies send letters of certification reminder because they want to make sure your connection to the public water supply has a backflow preventer to prevent backflow.

So what is backflow?

Backflow is the reversal of flow of non potable water or other substances through a cross-connection and into the piping of a public water system or consumer's potable water system. There are two types of backflow…backpressure backflow and backsiphonage.

Both are types of backflow are undesirable and the best place to add prevention is in the connection to the water service. The backflow preventer is installed on the street side of that connection.backflow assemb dia resized 600

Now we know what we are trying to prevent, how many backflow preventers do you need?

Generally, this would include the water service connection to each dedicated fire protection system or irrigation piping system and the water service connection to each of the following types of premises:

  • premises with an auxiliary or reclaimed water system
  • industrial, medical, laboratory, marine or other facilities where objectionable substances are handled in a way that could cause pollution or contamination of the public water system
  • premises exempt from the State Plumbing Code and premises where an internal backflow preventer required under the State Plumbing Code is not properly installed or maintained
  • classified or restricted facilities
  • tall buildings

Protect and keep your water safe to drink with someone you trust.

Master Craft Plumbing is Central and Northern Florida’s premier plumbing service company with a proven 34-year track record of partnering with property managers and owners to successfully install, repair, and certify large commercial plumbing and fire sprinkler systems. When you secure the services of Master Craft, you can be sure the job will be done right and on budget.

Next up, we will cover why certification is needed!

Tags: certification, backflow, preventer

Master Craft Explains the Backflow Preventer

Posted by Brian Johnston on Fri, Jan 7, 2011

Backflow preventer certification letters went out this January 2011 to  businesses, residents, and condominiums in our area. So the subject of this series of blog articles will explore what this device does for us all, who has or should have one, and why certification is needed.

3" Backflow Preventer

(i.e., backflow into a public water system can make the water in that system unusable or unsafe to drink)

Master Craft would like to help those who received a reminder letter—most customers have a year from your previous certification to re-certify.

Call us and we will get you scheduled. Master Craft has straight forward pricing based the size of your backflow preventer, 2 1/2", 3" and over 3", and can complete any repairs needed that may keep your backflow preventer from passing the certification. Unlike a P.O. Box plumber, once the certification paperwork is completed, we prepare the paperwork and mail it directly to utility company for you.

Protect and keep your water safe to drink with someone you trust.

Master Craft Plumbing is Central and Northern Florida’s premier plumbing service company with a proven 34-year track record of partnering with property managers and owners to successfully install, repair, and certify large commercial plumbing and fire sprinkler systems. When you secure the services of Master Craft, you can be sure the job will be done right and on budget.

Tags: certification, HubSpot Tips, backflow, preventer